How To Sprout Buckwheat and Quinoa
And Any Other Grain Or Seed You Like


Learn how to sprout quick-grow seeds like buckwheat and quinoa. We'll teach you step-by-step how it's done. Plus, the best easy-to-use sprouting trays.

We love to make buckwheat and quinoa sprouts because they're two of the easiest you can make. Why? Because it's so easy to get them to turn out perfect for you (unlike some other sprouts...yes, I'm talking to you, alfalfa!)

So we'll teach you how to do it step-by-step. Plus, why we use sprouting trays and which we recommend.

If you've never tasted your very own just-made sprouts you're in for a real treat.

Let's be clear -- buckwheat is raw, and kasha is the toasted version of buckwheat.

Always remember: You can't sprout anything that's already been cooked in any way, shape, or form.

Seeds, grains, beans, and whatever else you may sprout in your lifetime must be in its raw form.

Sprouts are a wonderful and easy way to add raw foods to your diet. They're the utmost in fresh because you eat them at their peak of life! You may notice, as I have, that when I add fresh sprouts to any meal you eat a lot less -- which really helps if you need to shed a few pounds.

Let's get started...


First and foremost you'll need something for your sprouts to grow in.

You can look online for all sorts of containers to use for making your sprouts. But my all-time favorite and super easy-to-use-ultra-non-high-techy tools are sprouting trays.

Sprouting Trays

Here's what they look like. They measure 8 inches x 10 inches x 2 inches high, and they function not only as a sprouter, but as a crisper. This allows you to store your sprouts in the fridge and they'll stay crispy and of the utmost in fresh.

There's a handy little removable divider so you can make smaller batches of more than one kind of sprouts, if you'd like. Or just remove the divider to make one big tray of one type of sprouts.

You can purchase one tray or more (I have 4), and what's so fabulous is they stack one on top of the other. This saves on space in your kitchen.

Okay, we're ready to move on...


How To Make Your Sprouts

We'll use buckwheat in our example. But the directions apply to anything you'd like to sprout, such as quinoa or lentils.

  1. Begin with 1 cup of raw buckwheat, rinse thoroughly, and drain. Pour the sprouts into a container (I use a wide-mouth jar) and fill with 2-3 times the amount of FILTERED water. Let sit 4-6 hours (I usually just let it sit overnight).

  2. Pour into a colander and rinse thoroughly. (Soaked buckwheat, in particular, happens to be surrounded by a bit of a thick, syrupy sort of liquid after soaking. Just keep rinsing and draining a few times until you feel it's rinsed as well as it's going to be. You'll know because there comes a point that the rinsing you're doing isn't REALLY making too much of a difference.)

  3. Lay the soaked seeds/lentils in your sprouting tray(s). Just line the bottom, no need to pile it on. If the bottom is lined and you still have more to use, just use a second tray.

    Look at the photo above. Do you see the flat little white tray that's sitting underneath the sprouting tray? Most sprouting trays come with two of those, one for the top and one for the bottom. So you have a tray underneath to catch any water drips and to allow air circulation, and one on top to keep your sprouts clean as they grow up to be big and strong. Awwwwww!    :)

  4. Now, put your covered sprouts in an out-of-the-way place -- I just set them on top of my fridge. You're going to rinse and drain these sprouts with clean, filtered water 3 times/day.

And that's all there is to making sprouts.

As long as you remember to water and drain your sprouts 3 times/day, they should be ready to eat in 2 days. You'll know they're ready because they'll have grown a teensy little tail -- and they taste almost sweet when they're at their best, with no bitter aftertaste.

Placing your sprouts in the refrigerator will halt the growing process.

When your sprouts are ready to go, do NOT rinse them before storing in the fridge. They should be dry when stored.

"Wait, back up Sassy...
"...did you say I have to water them 3 TIMES A DAY?
"I don't think I have time for this!"

Now, don't get your undies in a bundle. Let's try to make this work for you.

Since they grow so quickly, have them all soaked and ready to sprout when your weekend begins, and they should be sprouted and ready to refrigerate when you have to go back to start a fresh new work week.

Or, rinse and drain immediately upon waking, once in the middle of the day (or as soon as you get home from work), and once more before bedtime.

Tim Gunn

As Tim Gunn would say "Make it work!"



Happy sprouting!

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